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20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
's carriage accident and his return to washington, the famous state in which lincoln walks through richmond and then he returns to washington. the first thing lincoln does is go straight for the train station to see his friends who were in bed and seward wakes up and the two of them talk a while. seward cannot set up. in order to converse more comfortably, lincoln gets into bed with him, leaning on his elbow, and the two of them shot for an hour. >> how do we know? >> frederick's memoire, the son, and fannie seward, the daughter, kept a wonderful diary. >> he is 64. how old are his sons, augustus, frederick, and fannie? >> fannie is 19. augustus is late 20's. frederick, early 20's. >> they are young. what was the assassin's name? >> alternative names. lewis powell. late 20's. not more than that. a confederate veteran. a big man. 6 feet, 3 inches. it would have been army patrols immediately after the assassination. armed guards are around after, but no, no one protecting the secretary of state. some scholars think booth realized in the event of the debt of both the president and the vice pre
hate politics and washington so much? >> she hated it because she was made fun of. the ladies of washington did not like the way she dressed, did not like how her hair was done. they thought she was a rube. after all, he did not gain acceptance -- he was shunned by almost all of washington and most of the senators because he came from a corrupt background. they let her now at one point that you do not wear seersucker if you are a first lady. she responded, what is wrong with seersucker? it was a series of incidents like that that made her hate washington. she would only stay there a minimal number of months in the year when harry was senator. even when he became president, she did not like washington. the grandson has been just put together a collection of letters he found in the house in books. he claims she loved being a senator's wife. i put that in the book -- the book was finished but i managed to get it in the notes. i did not find that she really enjoyed being in washington. so we have a conundrum. >> do you still live on lincoln road in lincoln, massachusetts? >> i sti
. she wrote for the washington post for a number of years. >> what was her name? >> christine heineman. my father worked for general electric, and he now teaches up in boston. >> wasn't his father also well known? i learned this from you, but thousand how did they fit into the path? >> my parents and grandparents are amazing people. i feel very lucky. >> what did they do? >> my grandfather was a completely self--made man. his father actually killed himself in 1929 after the stock market crashed and he was left sort of alone to fend for his family, and he went to school, found his way into law school, and started out as a lawyer and then ended up running the northwest railroad and a number of businesses in chicago. he was very civic-minded, too. his advisors, president johnson and others. i think my dad and i sort of inherited a lot of his social beliefs, and i think i carry eye lot of that with the film making that i do for sure. >> why did you decide to study at dartmouth? >> i didn't know what i wanted to do with my life. i didn't have a lot of direction. i played sports in college.
actually. she was a science writer. she wrote for the "washington post." >> was -- >> christine russell. she kept her maiden name. my dad is a lawyer. he started in the public sector. and then ended his career for 20 years working for general electric. and now teaches up in boston. >> this is the well-known ben hineman. wasn't his father also well known? >> yes. >> explain that. actually this is the first i've learned this from you. but how do they fit into the past? >> i had a very -- my parents and my grandparents are amazing people. i feel very lucky. >> what did they do? >> my grandfather was a self-made man. his father actually killed himself in 1929 after the stock market crashed and he was left sort of alone to fend for his family. he went to school, climbed his way into law school, and started out as a lawyer and then ended up running northwest railroad and a number of other businesses in chicago. and was very civic minded, too. he was an advise tor president johnson and others. i think my dad and i have sort of inherited a lot of his social beliefs. and i think i carry a lot of
available as c-span podcasts. >> next, live, your calls and comments on "washington journal." live at 10:00 a.m., the american enterprise institute hosts a discussion on how federal rules and regulations affect private enterprise and education with representatives from the bill and melinda gates foundation and the education department. >> if you listen to mayor bloomberg who says that the damage was unprecedented, that it may be the worst storm of the city has ever faced, the tidal surge -- the storm was 14 feet -- gov. christie said the damage in new jersey was unthinkable. we had fires, we had hurricane force wing -- arcane force winds, we have a snowe, you look at and the flooding of the subway system and the shutdown of the stock exchange, you get a sense of the massive scope and scale of this storm. yet the networks performed. i have read dozens of stories about how for many consumers, their only link to information or to people was through their smartphone, linking a social media and the smartphone. while there was obviously an impact on a cell sites, i think the networks perform w
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)

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